Brain Tumours - Tumours of the Central Nervous System

CNS-tumours are the most common solid tumours. Following leukaemias, they account for the second most frequent cancer during childhood and adolescence. There are many types of primary brain tumours: low-grade gliomas (astrocytomas, gangliogliomas, oligodendrogliomas), high grade gliomas (anaplastic astrocytoma and glioblastoma multiforme), medulloblastomas (= primitive neuroectodermal tumours; PNET), ependymomas and craniopharyngiomas.

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Brain Tumours

Tumours of the central nervous system (CNS)

Primary tumours of the central nervous system (CNS-tumours) originate in the brain or the spinal cord. With about 430 newly diagnosed paediatric patients in Germany per year, CNS-tumours are the most common solid tumours. Following leukaemias, they account (with about 24%) for the second most frequent childhood cancer. There are many types of primary brain tumours, such as low-grade or high-grade gliomas, medulloblastomas and other primitive neuroectodermal tumours (CNS-PNET), and ependymomas. Here, you will find information on primary brain tumours. Other pages will offer information on CNS metastases of other cancers.

Low-grade gliomas

Here, you will find our information on low-grade gliomas and current treatment concepts:

High-grade gliomas

Here, you will find our information on high-grade gliomas and current treatment concepts:

Medulloblastoma, CNS-PNET, and pineoblastoma

Here, you will find our information on medulloblastoma, supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumours (CNS-PNET), pineoblastoma, and current treatment concepts:

Ependymoma

Our information on ependymoma and current treatment concepts can be found here:

Trials / Registries

Almost all European
children and teenagers with brain tumours are treated according to standardised protocols based on clinical trials or registries. Currently active trials / registries:

Literature and work material

Treatment guidelines, follow-up plans, reports on clinical trials and more (partly only available in German)

For more reading

You will find a small selection of additional information on brain tumours provided by external sources here: